EDWARDIAN NEWS FROM THE MEWS, 21

Submitted by Editor on Sat, 05/06/2021 - 08:23

EDINBURGH CHAUFFEUR’S SUNDAY MORNING RUN.

ALLEGED EXCESS OF THE LEGAL LIMIT.

John Wallace, 26 Carlton Terrace Lane, Edinburgh, was charged before Sheriff Guy at Edinburgh Sheriff Summary Court to-day with having, on Sunday morning, 13th August, between Norton Plaoe and Willowbrae Road, driven a motor car under his care at a speed exceeding 20 miles an hour, contrary to the Motor Act. He was also charged with having failed to produce his licence when asked by Police Inspector Brown. He pleaded not guiily, and evidence was led.

MOTORING AT 30 MILES AN HOUR.

Inspector David Brown, Edinburgh City Police, said his attention was attracted by the noise of the approaching car, which he thought was going at thirty miles an hour at least. Witness was standing at Abbey Church when the car passed. He immediately walked along to Earlston Place. From a point there could he could command a view of the road right down to Willobrae Road, and when witness looked down the motor was out of sight, only the falling dust showing where it had passed.

Subsequently, witness, having taken the number of the car, saw it coming back and signalled to the chauffeur, to stop. He did so, and being asked for his licence, said he had not it with him. He also told the Inspector that he did not think he was driving too fast.

HOW FAST DO POLICEMEN WALK.

car

Cross-examined by an agent for accused, Inspector Brown said the average pace at which policeman walked was three miles an hour. The Agent: My experience is that he walks two miles an hour. (Laughter.)

Constable Paterson, who also saw the car, estimated the speed at 25 to 30 miles an hour, and Mr Fyfe, dairyman, Sunnybank, gave corroborative evidence as to speed. Other witnesses also stated that the car was going at a greater speed than twenty miles an hour, and one witness said he thought the car was running away.

THE DEFENCE.

William Henderson, coachman, was the first witness examined for the defence. He was in the car, accused having suggested to him to come with him while he tried the car. The road was clear, and the car was under perfect control. He had an idea the speed the car was going at. It was a little faster than horses go, and about twice as fast as a cable car. They went right down to Bath Street, Portobello, and came back. They never thought they had done anything wrong.

Wallace, the accused, was the only other witness for the defence. He took the car out to test it after some trouble which had been experienced with noisy engines had been obviated. The road was perfectly clear, the car was quite under control, and going within the legal speed limit, so that he did not think he was doing any harm. The reason he could not produce his licence was that he had inadvertently taken it out of his pocket on Saturday night with a number of other papers and left it in his room.

Sheriff Guy found both charges proved. Renton, the fiscal, did not move for sentence in regard to the second charge— failing to produce his licence. A nominal penalty of £l, or seven days’ imprisonment was Imposed for the other offence.

Edinburgh Evening News, 18 November 1905.

[Images: Michael V. Dixon, Old Police Cells and Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences.]

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